Poverty Pants Display Old Style

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Poverty Pants Display Old Style

SUNDAY JEANS: Freshmen Ava Morgan and senior Kate Linford show off their holy jeans.

SUNDAY JEANS: Freshmen Ava Morgan and senior Kate Linford show off their holy jeans.

SUNDAY JEANS: Freshmen Ava Morgan and senior Kate Linford show off their holy jeans.

SUNDAY JEANS: Freshmen Ava Morgan and senior Kate Linford show off their holy jeans.

McKenna Brog, Staff Writer

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When you see a pair of torn jeans what do you think of? Style or sloppy? It is pretty well-known that millennials think a lot differently about their rips than the older generations who constantly raise questions like, “When did you wreck on your bike or when are you going to patch your pants because back in my day, holes were a bad thing.” Real funny people even offer to buy new jeans for those wearing ripped ones.

Ripped jeans, however, are not a new style. Many of our teachers back in the 1980’s channeled their inner Van Halen and wore torn jeans while others embraced the grunge of holy jeans during the 1990’s and early 2000’s. Just like ‘mom’ jeans, ripped denim has definitely come back and the older generations aren’t loving it. They don’t seem to bother the women near as badly as the men.

Chemistry teacher Mr. Nethercott said, “I think they are disgusting myself. But I grew up  in a family where if you had holes in your clothes you were poor.”

 

 

 

 

English teacher Mr. Patterson, not a fan of the look, said, “I think you should be able to get them for half the price. What would students think if teachers started wearing them? Can you wear them on Sundays?”

 

 

 

 

Students see the down side but still appreciate the fashion statement. Junior Sophia Steglich, “They get a bit chilly at times, but sometimes they can make or break the outfit! My dad always tells me that I live in Wyoming and shall not be wearing them, especially in the winter. I get asked a lot how much I paid for them, and if I need money for some new ones and that gets annoying, but it’s worth it.”

 

 

 

 

 

English teacher Mr. Waldron takes a moderate view.  “I don’t mind them as long as they are mid thigh and down.They are getting a bit high, and that’s going to mess them up for everybody,” said Waldron.

 

 

 

 

Physical Education teacher Mrs. Filibi sees a lost opportunity in ripped jeans. “I could have made some bank on pants I threw away. I could have retired selling pants to students.”

 

 

 

 

School counselor Mr. Frazier cautions, “They don’t bother me until they start approaching ‘sensitive’ areas.”

 

 

 

 

 

Freshmen Kennedy Pebbles shows her age with her opinion.  “I think ripped jeans are okay. I think the school’s rules on them are fine, and I like when boys wear ripped jeans too. I don’t like getting asked where the rest of my jeans are at though,” said Pebbles.

 

 

 

 

 

Junior Tanner Thomas takes a practical economic view. He said, “I think they’re stupid. They are the same price or more than regular jeans and that’s stupid. Just go buy a regular pair of pants and put holes in them yourself if that’s what you want.”

 

 

 

 

Fashion comes and goes, and comes back around again. Mr. Patterson may not remember wearing ripped 501’s to a rock concert, but he probably did. Whether this new trend sticks around or runs afoul of the dress code remains to be seen.

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