New Remediation Time Focuses on Getting Work Done

SVHS+STUDENTS+PUTTING+IN+WORK%3A+Students+sit+in+on+their+English+class+as+the+new+year+picks+back+up+again.+One+of+the+changes+this+year+comes+in+the+form+of+remediation+time%2C+something+that+took+the+place+of+guided+reading.
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New Remediation Time Focuses on Getting Work Done

SVHS STUDENTS PUTTING IN WORK: Students sit in on their English class as the new year picks back up again. One of the changes this year comes in the form of remediation time, something that took the place of guided reading.

SVHS STUDENTS PUTTING IN WORK: Students sit in on their English class as the new year picks back up again. One of the changes this year comes in the form of remediation time, something that took the place of guided reading.

SVHS STUDENTS PUTTING IN WORK: Students sit in on their English class as the new year picks back up again. One of the changes this year comes in the form of remediation time, something that took the place of guided reading.

SVHS STUDENTS PUTTING IN WORK: Students sit in on their English class as the new year picks back up again. One of the changes this year comes in the form of remediation time, something that took the place of guided reading.

Gabe Clinger, staff writer

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With Jason Horsley stepping in as the new principal of Star Valley High, it looks like good things are on their way for this small town school. In an attempt to balance the needs and wants of the students with the academic requirements of the school, Horsley introduced a new remediation system. Horsley gave his insight into the remediation program and how it is intended to function.

Horsley addressed problems with the old system using guided reading and fifth hour when he implemented daily remediation time for students who have to attend on a sliding scale based on their year in school. “As I surveyed the staff and met with parents and community people ,one of the biggest challenges was the amount of transitions through out the school day. Fifth period had kind of gone away; kids thought it was optional.

The new program for remediation is required but gives students more freedom and responsibility. “While they’re [students] here, we give them a short window to take care of their business because they just have to. Some kids just need additional time, but then we reward them if they take care of business and get [students] in and get them out. We want to get them home earlier.” This year school ends at 3:35 pm as opposed to last year’s schedule that had students heading home at 3:45 pm.

The main issue brought up by skeptics and supports alike was the distinct possibility that students might not take responsibility for what they had to get done and try to take advantage of their teachers so they could get to their new free time without doing what needed to be done first. The solution that Horsley posed was to trade time for time. If students decide to take a longer lunch when the weren’t supposed to, they have to pay that time back in detention.

“The long lunch Tuesday through Friday is great! The only issue is that on Mondays 25 minutes is not enough time to get a decent lunch,” said athlete and senior Nate Matthews. It looks like the new system is definitely answering the pleas and cries of fourth year students, but change comes with its own drawbacks. It’s allowing the students to get work done and have their free time at the expense of a shorter lunch on select days.

Of course if you implement a school wide system it affects the teachers too. “The system has been nice so far,” said Mrs. Clinger, a science teacher at the high school. She hopes that students will “continue to do what they need to do  to  earn a longer lunch.” From a teacher stand point, the system seems to be working well, but change is always difficult. “It feels as though we’re making progress in working out those kinks. We’re heading in the right direction now,” said Clinger.

It seems as though the new principal of SVHS has big aspirations and just the right amount of gusto to get them done. Now it’s just a matter of seeing when, or if, it all come together.

 

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